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The Four Seasons + memorable song lyrics

jpierrepontcriss:

i miss harry potter i miss midnight book release parties i miss reading until i physically can’t stay awake any longer i miss the anticipation for the next story i miss midnight movie premieres i miss dressing up sweater tie cloak and all for the midnight movie premieres i miss the WB logo zooming in to hedwig’s theme i miss crying with 400 other fans in the theater over character deaths I MISS HARRY POTTER SO FUCKING MUCH i’ll never be okay again

elsaofarendelle:

Disney Battles: Challenge 1 + Favourite Female Characters

Elsa and Rapunzel

the-book-ferret:

for-the-love-of-a-photographer:

50-shades-of-sassy-ymir:

johnlockinthetardiswithdestiel:

comboreversal:

puffpuffpeace:

baby baby baby 

This literally just crushed me.

I WILL NEVER MAKE ANOTHER GRUMPY CAT JOKE AS LONG AS I LIVE

mother of god, we have all done a sin

Its like an animal abuse commercial 

Tardar Sauce is the sweetest!

floralls:

*** (by felidae.)

fourcollybirds:

i cracked up at ‘it means I’m allergic to dairy products’ 

just-another-dream:

The best part is he gets slowly more annoyed

bilbo + outfits 

(bonus): 

completelytwitterpated:

Mericcup Week 2014
Day 3: I Choose You by Sara Bareilles

Merida knew of the Vikings a long, long time ago. She knew of a scrawny boy from Berk named Hiccup, who befriended Dragons despite the ongoing war between them and his kind. They grew up together, got to know each other better, and given time, it could’ve been more. But Hiccup decided it was time for him to return to Berk. “The Vikings need me, Mer. I need to teach them that Dragons aren’t our enemies.” And before she could persuade him to stay, he had gone.

Many years later, she finds herself on her Wedding Day - a clan arrangement, of course, all her Mother’s doing - remembering the young Viking, who left her to do what was right. Dressed in her white, spotless wedding gown, her only thought is, “Hiccup is off someplace, somewhere, doing his duty as a Viking. Is this not my duty, as well?”

But he goes ahead and bursts through her doors, daring to show his face. He dares to stand before her, all grown up with his stupid, disheveled hair, with pleading eyes asking her not to get married, asking her to make a choice, asking her not to leave him despite he doing so all those years ago.

He should’ve expected her response.

"I’m a princess, Hiccup. It’s an occupational hazard."

troylerisinyou:

i guess you learn something new every day

princessesfanarts:

Source

kenbocalrissian:

shehasathree:

kanthia:

raggediestandi:

itsvondell:

off-in-lala-land:

You know, if I was a parent, it would be at this point that I’d rip the game from his hands, stash it in my backpack, and force him to enjoy history goddamnit. This vacation cost a lot and the game is only for the hotel and travel time.

imagine trying to force someone to think that stonehenge is fun

"look kid we’re a ridiculous distance from a bunch of broken rocks how could you possibly be bored this is totally an appropriate vacation spot for someone this age."

Ah, fuck. Shit like this always gets to me, the tired old technophobe spiel and maybe it’s because it’s so rampant in my field (I work in outdoor education), but it just starts feeling so goddamn derivative after a while, nouveau hipsters who think the world is ending because kids play too many video games.
But what we’re missing is that this kid’s parents bought him his SP and a copy of Leaf Green (the employee at the game store said it would be perfect for him) so that he would shut up on the plane ride over and not bother them in the hotel, imagining that as soon as they touched down the kid would put the thing down and appreciate all the castles and grass and cafes and operas and rocks and ~*~culture~*~, because that’s what culture and history are, right? A bunch of old rocks.
What they missed is this kid staying up way past his bedtime the night before their plane flew out on message boards and chat rooms trying to find out which is the best starter, finally settled on a Squirtle and named it Rocky, and right now while his parents are appreciating rocks he and Rocky have got to save the whole world from Team Rocket because he’s a hero and that’s what heroes do and he’s so invested in this story and this world, he thinks he might have found the place where Machops live, why should he care about a guide droning on about Romans and a bunch of old people taking pictures?But please, go ahead and take the Gameboy from him, break it in half and remind him that you spent A LOT on this vacation, and HOW DARE HE. You will FORCE him to ENJOY his GODDAMN VACATION because it’s REAL LIFE. Wonder why he’s so upset, you’re the one who spent money on the thing? All he invested in it was time and emotion, and those things are definitely less important than money, when you’re eight. Wonder why he’s so disconnected from education, when you’ve managed to turn it into a punishment, a deprivation, a source of misery? Go on and repeat the tired old technophobe line until you’re red in the face, share it on Facebook and reblog it on Tumblr and retweet it on Twitter: nobody but you knows how to live ~*~REAL LIFE~*~ because we’re so busy exploring imaginary worlds.
Kids don’t just need to be taught when to use devices, we as their parents and guardians also need to be taught why they use devices. If a kid is more invested in Kanto than Stonehenge, why? How can we change our approach so kids ~*~appreciate real history~*~? And if not, can’t we just accept and appreciate that this kid will go back to the third grade, say “Yeah, I saw Stonehenge, it was neat, but who wants to trade a Haunter for my Machoke?”

the commentary!

That was quite possibly the most effective argument on the subject I’ve ever read!  Thank you, that was an eye-opening perspective… even as one who plays video games all the time, I don’t think I could have come to the same conclusion.

kenbocalrissian:

shehasathree:

kanthia:

raggediestandi:

itsvondell:

off-in-lala-land:

You know, if I was a parent, it would be at this point that I’d rip the game from his hands, stash it in my backpack, and force him to enjoy history goddamnit. This vacation cost a lot and the game is only for the hotel and travel time.

imagine trying to force someone to think that stonehenge is fun

"look kid we’re a ridiculous distance from a bunch of broken rocks how could you possibly be bored this is totally an appropriate vacation spot for someone this age."

Ah, fuck. Shit like this always gets to me, the tired old technophobe spiel and maybe it’s because it’s so rampant in my field (I work in outdoor education), but it just starts feeling so goddamn derivative after a while, nouveau hipsters who think the world is ending because kids play too many video games.

But what we’re missing is that this kid’s parents bought him his SP and a copy of Leaf Green (the employee at the game store said it would be perfect for him) so that he would shut up on the plane ride over and not bother them in the hotel, imagining that as soon as they touched down the kid would put the thing down and appreciate all the castles and grass and cafes and operas and rocks and ~*~culture~*~, because that’s what culture and history are, right? A bunch of old rocks.

What they missed is this kid staying up way past his bedtime the night before their plane flew out on message boards and chat rooms trying to find out which is the best starter, finally settled on a Squirtle and named it Rocky, and right now while his parents are appreciating rocks he and Rocky have got to save the whole world from Team Rocket because he’s a hero and that’s what heroes do and he’s so invested in this story and this world, he thinks he might have found the place where Machops live, why should he care about a guide droning on about Romans and a bunch of old people taking pictures?

But please, go ahead and take the Gameboy from him, break it in half and remind him that you spent A LOT on this vacation, and HOW DARE HE. You will FORCE him to ENJOY his GODDAMN VACATION because it’s REAL LIFE. Wonder why he’s so upset, you’re the one who spent money on the thing? All he invested in it was time and emotion, and those things are definitely less important than money, when you’re eight. Wonder why he’s so disconnected from education, when you’ve managed to turn it into a punishment, a deprivation, a source of misery? Go on and repeat the tired old technophobe line until you’re red in the face, share it on Facebook and reblog it on Tumblr and retweet it on Twitter: nobody but you knows how to live ~*~REAL LIFE~*~ because we’re so busy exploring imaginary worlds.

Kids don’t just need to be taught when to use devices, we as their parents and guardians also need to be taught why they use devices. If a kid is more invested in Kanto than Stonehenge, why? How can we change our approach so kids ~*~appreciate real history~*~? And if not, can’t we just accept and appreciate that this kid will go back to the third grade, say “Yeah, I saw Stonehenge, it was neat, but who wants to trade a Haunter for my Machoke?”

the commentary!

That was quite possibly the most effective argument on the subject I’ve ever read!  Thank you, that was an eye-opening perspective… even as one who plays video games all the time, I don’t think I could have come to the same conclusion.

maddyoverboard:

skelebrina:

punkbeds:

BOYS TO AVOID:
-boys that are against feminism
-boys that call girls sluts and whores
-boys that think a vagina gets loose after having a lot of sex
-white boys that use the n word
-bronies

-boys that fall asleep after sex without making sure their partner is satisfied
-boys that insult others to compliment you
-boys that insult anyone
-boys that are rude to their parents

- boys